Things Placed In Front of The Magazine Rack: The Cubbies Edition

Editor’s Note: Permanent music video for this series. See if you  can guess the significance…

Here we go again. There’s been a lot of interest in the Chicago Cubs this year for obvious reasons. So much so that two publishers actually put out Chicago Cubs book-a-zines in the weeks leading up to the World Series.

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Wanna buy a Cubs World Series Special? Yeah, good luck with that!

It is not surprising that within hours of the Cubs winning their first World Series in 108 years, every brick and mortar store in Chicago and the collar counties put out giant racks of blue Cubs shirts, hats and every other sort of tchotchke and gizmo you can imagine.

And of course, a few other publishers got in on the game and put out their world series specials.

However at this particular retailer not only has the mainline rack been cut down in size and shunted from the retailers’ dead zone to the retailers’ even deader zone, but unsold Cubs merchandise got stuck in front of the mainline.

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It’s money that matters.

Our industry continues to launch a lot of new product. Most of what I’ve seen these days is better written, produced on better paper and offers better value even though the cover price is higher. Unfortunately, much of it is also niche and doesn’t come close to replacing the sales we’ve lost from general interest mass merchandise titles.

As a result, we can expect to continue to see smaller racks, and obscured racks.

So I moved the cart and the rack.

 

Thing Placed (Yet Again) In Front Of The Magazine Rack

There are admittedly many advantages to the way the newsstand sales business is organized these days. For example, if I have a decent wi-fi signal I can quickly find out exactly where my magazine is selling. And where it isn’t. With a few mouse clicks, I can download sales history, competitive sales history, class of trade data, top performing stores and more. With a few more mouse clicks I can send off a note to a distributor or retailer and make a presentation about why my ranking should be changed or a certain issue is being promoted.

On the other hand, there are few compelling reasons outside of curiosity or a desire to travel, for me to get into a car or board an airplane and jet off to Louisville, KY (Once the home of a decent sized wholesaler) to see what the displays in that town look like.

So I was pretty thrilled a few weeks ago to get in my car and drive for a few hours to meet with a regional publishing client face to face. In fact I was so happy to get out of my oddly shaped office that the day before the appointment I did something I hadn’t done for years outside of my own home base: I set up a retail check-up route, left hours before the appointment and spent the morning checking stores.

The trip had some nostalgia to it because this town was once home to one of my favorite wholesalers. To be fair, the wholesalers who now manage the retailers in this town do a good job. Most displays were perfectly fine.

But….

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Got milk. But got no magazines!

And then there was this:

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No whining just because you can’t get to your favorite magazine now…

And a few others I didn’t capture very well on camera. To be fair, most displays were perfectly fine.  But the ones above are memorable and they occur far too frequently for comfort in an industry that is constantly under assault.

A few weeks ago, fellow consultant John Morthanos put up a post on Publishing Executive where he argued for expanding the title mix at checkout. He posited, correctly I think, that the checkout was dominated by seven publishers. Most of these titles had experienced significant circulation declines so wouldn’t it make sense to experiment? Try out new titles, new categories? Shouldn’t we make the checkout more, well, democratic and meritorious (my interpretation)? He went so far as to suggest, to the apparent horror of some of our colleagues, that one checkout in each store should be designated for these up and coming titles.

John is on to something. Without diving deep into the data, it’s probably fair to say that the crash of newsstand sales over the past seven years has come mostly from the checkout. The celebrity weeklies are the biggest culprits. The uptick we see in the sales of book a zines, adult coloring books, and niche titles like The Backwoodsman and so many regional city books, guns and survivalist titles  can’t make up for the hundreds of thousands of lost units in weekly celebrity and women’s service magazines if these trending titles are relegated to the back row of a twelve-foot mainline.

There are opportunities opening up in some chains. Over the past few years, most Kroger owned banners have either re-racked their stores or opened them up to a program called “Pay to Stay”. For the record, that title, “Pay to Stay” is not nearly as ominous as it sounds. “Pay to Stay” or PTS for short, is a one-year checkout program where the retailer does not install new racks, but does ask all the titles on the rack to pay for a relogo program – or give up their space. Open pockets are then offered to other titles – often titles that are growing and ranked highly on the mainline.

The cost for this program is significantly less than a new rack program. In the last cycle, I was able to move a client who had a national publication and multiple regional titles into many markets where in the past we were relegated to the mainline and could only dream of putting the titles onto the checkout.

The program is managed by TNG’s RS2 division. It is interesting to note that the program is billed in quarterly increments and publishers can opt out if they give notice one quarter in advance. This was a huge plus in gaining the participation of my client. And no, they didn’t opt out.

Since then I have come across more programs like this. You don’t always get in. You don’t always get what you want. But it’s a small step in the right direction.

I am seeing more and more requests from retailers for publishers to be more active in promoting their titles on the newsstand and partnering with the retailers to promote their magazines in their stores. A recent letter from the Costco buying team comes to mind.

For my part, I have always encouraged the publishers I work with to announce the on-sale dates of their titles, feature their cover images and stories and promote the availability of the magazine in national and local retailers in their social media feeds and e-blasts. Why wouldn’t you try to make a sale?

Of course, we can and should do more. No matter how wonderful home delivery, drone delivery and and driverless cars may be and become, people are social animals. We need to interact. We like to get out of our homes from time to time. Anyone who works from a home office can tell you about that.

In the meantime, a recent tour of some local retailers over the July 4th weekend showed that we still have a long way to go.

While Whole Foods, has and always will get props from me for their unlogo’d checkouts, last weekend they popped a bunch of mobile carts in front of their checkouts. On the one hand, you can’t blame a retailer for wanting to boost impulse sales over a busy holiday weekend. But to me, it’s a chilling reminder of how tenuous our hold on the checkout is. It also makes you wonder why our industry didn’t approach them with an idea for the busy holiday weekend.

The local Jewel Supermarket was selling t-shirts at their checkouts.

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Go Cubs Go!

As bricks and mortar retailers come under increasing pressure from on-line retailers and changing customer patterns, our industry would be wise to continue to reinvent how we do business. John happens to be right. We need to experiment more.

But we also need to make sure that there are fewer things in front of the magazine rack.

 

Five Simple Steps To Fix The Newsstand Industry

Nope. This post won’t address the Pay on Scan issue. Nor does it contain specific financial or production advice to the remaining three biggest wholesalers. There is no “10 Point Plan!” demonstrating how our four largest national distributors can remain relevant.

Are these the right steps to fix the business? My nose has been on the grindstone for much of the past four months and these thoughts are what smacked me upside the head yesterday afernoon after reflecting on what passed for a heavily revised and reviewed print order landed in my in-box.

So…

Five Simple Steps To fix the Newsstand Industry:

1. All sales are local.

2. Sell local. Can you learn what sells in that store? If you can’t, why are you messing with that make order? If you don’t know, why are you servicing that store?

3. Promote the category. If publishers, national distributors and wholesalers can’t get together to promote our product, then who will? What reason are we giving readers to go out and “discover” our product?

4. Stop undercutting our own category with cheap subscriptions.

5. Stop whinging about digital. It’s here. Deal with it. Work with it. Learn it.

Any questions?

Upon further review, I’d add the following:

2a. Make the tools to discover what sells in that store readily available and CHEAP to acquire. Most publishers, mainline publishers at least, already give up 60% or more of their cover price to get to that store (Not including promotional dollars). They should be encouraged to understand their distribution and have input into how it is developed. After all, they know their readers. Their customers are the retailers customers.

2b. Make the tools that drive distribution more universal in nature and marketing driven. Everyone involved in distribution should be able, at a quick glance, to know rack size, number of checkouts, store demographics and store volume when they make a distribution decision.

Where’ve I been? Very busy. And there are about 12  transcripts sitting in the edit que waiting to be edited. But for a solo practioner who’s also trying to learn a new facet of the business one can either work or write blog postings. Blogging is important. But I have to admit that paying work and reasonably satisfied customers takes precedent. I hope to be back up to speed with more topics as we move towards the end of the year.

On a related front: I am intrigued with the hints we’ve received from media guru Bob Sacks and fellow consultant Luke Magerko. So far, they’ve revealed some pretty straightforward suggestions that daily practitioners like this writer and many of my colleagues attempt to practice. Hopefully there are more reveals that will hape this industry rethink, in a positive, sales growth oriented manner how we work.

Because who in their right mind wants to work in and manage a declining industry?

Overused, Desensitized, Underwhelmed

Aside

With that being said I am literally sick and tired of the literal use of the word literal.

Literally.

I’d declare a moratorium on it all, but at the end of the day, who’d pay any attention?

It’s as if the gods of buzzspeak had already won. Literally.

Things Placed In Front of The Magazine Rack: The (Post) Valentine’s Day Edition

According to an article that appeared in Business Insider this week, print magazines are dying because people in check out lanes are spending all of their time looking at their smart phones and not looking at all of the magazines, iced tea, pop, candy, cookies and wiffle bats in the check out racks.

I don’t think that any reasonable person who spends time living in the 21st century would argue that many people spend much of their spare time checking things out on their smart phones. And anyone who spends time considering the impact of mobile technology on single copy sales is aware that people waiting in a checkout line may prefer to look at their smart phones rather than at the merchandise they could pick up.

But while it’s nice to speculate that smart phone technology is distracting people from spending money in the checkout, if you’re going to make a grand generalization like that, you may want to back that up with something that is generally called a “study.”

If I were the publisher of a major checkout publication and worried that people weren’t looking at my carefully posed models or beautifully laid out food designs, I’d consider trying out some of the new virtual reality designs on my cover. Entice people with attractive offers and QR codes.

Of course, we can generalize that there may be other reasons that single copy sales were down this year.

Here’s one:

Dear Star and Enquirer, Happy Valentine's Day. Love, Bunny

Dear AMI, Happy Valentine’s Day. Love, Hallmark and the plush toy industry.

There’s bound to be a great backstory to this and as soon as I can get it, I will update here.

Note: Please keep sending your photos. It’s been enormous fun  seeing views from other parts of the country. Of course, if you come across an interesting and creative display that works, I would be more than happy to post and celebrate that. Innovative titles and merchandising are the lifeblood of our business. Pending another round of interesting “Things Placed in Front Of” photos, next week we’ll return to some scheduled discussions of “Disruptive Technology” and editing (Yes, this blog in particular).

Things Placed In Front of The Magazine Rack: The Wayback Machine Edition

Like many people, I’m a collector of non collectable collectables. Most of them land on my desk, in my desk, in my desk drawers, in desk drawers that rarely, if ever, get opened.

Earlier this week I found myself highly frustrated with the lack of work space in my office. The solution I came up with was to open up a few drawers to see if I could take some of the clutter from the top of my desk and put it inside my desk to deal with “later.” That was unfortunate.

It turned out that the drawers were already full of stuff that I had previously dumped into these drawers over the past few months. Out of sight, out of mind.

Cue the nursery school teachers singing “Clean up, clean up, everybody, everywhere…”

You can thank me for that ear-worm later.

To make a very long story slightly shorter: Here, in the middle of circulation audit season, right smack dab in the middle of “Is the promotion budget for 2013 the right size?” Just as the questions are starting to come in, “So how are we doing this year?” I suddenly decide to go on a “I gotta clean this up and make some space!” detour.

In the bottom of a drawer that will very soon be almost empty (Hey, paperless office! Sort of.), I came across a drugstore photo sleeve from 2004. In it were a series of pictures that I had taken at retail. I don’t recall having a film camera back then, but I must have because there were actual film negatives in the sleve with the pictures. But what was remarkable were a few pictures in the collection that could have been entries in last year’s popular “Things Placed In Front of The Magazine Rack” series.

Walking stick, Big Bird or a cool gift bag with your mag?

Walking stick, Big Bird or a cool gift bag with your mag?

If I were a Frenchman, right about now I would say,

“Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose.”

But I’m not, and as I don’t feel like writing out any swear words, I will just say,

“SSDD.”

The only way we will ever slow the encroachment of our retail space (That we do actually pay for via RDA, enhanced discount, purchased check out positions and promotional incentives) is if we help our wholesalers and their merchandisers to more vigorously protect our space. The only way I see that ever happening is if our publishing community stops treating single copy sales as the third class citizen of the publishing community. Then maybe our retailers will catch on.

Will that happen?

Hmmmm.

“SSDD?”

Note: I’m going to keep the “Things Placed In Front of The Magazine Rack” series going. So please feel free to send me your photos from retail to joe.berger at newsstandpros.com. 

Things Placed In Front of The Magazine Rack: The Thanksgiving Turkey Edition

It’s the weekend before Thanksgiving. One of the busiest weeks in the supermarket world. In the magazine business, it’s the run up to the very busy Christmas season. Customers are in and out of the stores picking up all of the goodies they need for their Thanksgiving meals. Store traffic is way up.

We’re hosting Thanksgiving this year and the cashier and I had a good laugh when I announced that I’d probably be seeing her at least six more times this week (I’ll most likely break that promise by a few extra visits).

On the one hand, I can understand why stores will place additional displays in the check lanes. They’re temporary, the manufacturer probably paid a lot for the displays, and it’s hard to say no to ready cash when you’re in such a thin margin business like the grocery business.

Of course, we publishers and our wholesalers also operate on a very thin margin and it costs a lot of up front money to be in the check out so…

Magazines, chocolates and pretzels all go together. Just not this way.

This does make it a little difficult to promote the expansion of check out pockets.

You certainly wouldn’t want to catch a cold while you’re bringing your new magazines home.

Higher end chocolates and an empty pocket FTW.

It’s easy to say this is  a long standing problem (It is), and there’s no easy solution (Certainly seems that way), but it also doesn’t say a lot for how the retailers view our line of product. How do we change that?